Home of the Happy Hen
Articles
sitemap
sitemap
recipes
links I like
articles, news and tips
about the author
bookshelf - reviews and recommendations
shop online

Cheese, please.

Most of the cheeses I use are European styles and may be difficult to obtain in supermarkets in the US, although it's certainly worth seeking them out at a Delicatessan. Good cheese is a wondrous thing, and the reason I could never be a Vegan.

Most cheeses should be served at room temperature for maximum taste, so take them out of the fridge an hour or so before you serve them. US versions are usually far milder than their European counterparts- even the strongest "tasty" American Cheddar has less bite than a mild English one. Personally I love a cheese that bites back. Some of my favourites actually give me ulcers they're so strong - but I don't mind :)

Many cheeses contain rennet, which may NOT be vegetarian.

Rennet is a substance made from the lining of calves stomachs and then more recently, pigs, has traditionally been used to coagulate cheese in commerical production.

Over recent years as this has become more expensive and unpopular. This has partly been because of the BSE (Mad Cow) scare in Europe, and also developments in genetic engineering making synthetic rennet inexpensive to produce. Thankfully, although they weren't specifically developed for us, many of these alternatives are suitable for vegetarians.

There are literally hundreds of types of cheese, I've just listed a few common ones and my personal favourites.

Hard:
Cheddar, Cheshire, Red Leicester, Wensleydale, Parmesan, Romano, Pecorino, Feta

Rubbery:
Mozzarella, Bocconcini, Gouda, Edam, Gruyere, Smoked, Havarti

Soft, unripened:
Ricotta, Cottage Cheese, Cream Cheeses (eg, Philadelphia, Neufchatel, Mascarpone), Creme Fraiche, Farmhouse or Curd Cheese

Soft, ripened:
Camembert, Brie, Stilton, Danish Blue, Castello, Chevre ("Goat Cheese")

Note: Most cheeses should be served at room temperature for maximum taste, so take them out of the fridge an hour or so before you serve them.

There are vegan (soy) cheeses available, but I have yet to find one that doesn't taste like rubber.

Unless otherwise specified, store cheese in the fridge, wrapped in Cling Film or in an airtight storage container.

LINKS

The Vegetarian Society of UK's Cheese Info Sheet:

vegsoc.org/info/cheese.html

Tillamook Cheese, USA:

tillamookcheese.com/products/cheese.html

National Vegetarian Cheese List (US)

cheese.joyousliving.com

Amazon's new Gourmet Foods section:

Amazon.com Cheeses

 

 

retrokat.com - quite nice sites
site, hosting and all contents copyright retrokat.com